30 day nuturing email campaign

 
 
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Dealing with collection agencies (Day 10)

Hello,

Collection agencies are at the bottom of the barrel when it comes down to business. The only thing they care about is cold, hard cash. They don’t care if you’ve just lost your job, your spouse, or your health. Their job is to bleed you of money any way they can. However, you can stop them in their tracks by applying your newfound knowledge and the law. There are several tactics you can use in standing up to a collection agency, including saying the right words, sending a detailed letter, or quoting the law.

What is a collection agency?

Collection agencies are third-party companies that use aggressive tactics to collect outstanding debts from consumers. Old debts are either assigned or sold to the collector by a creditor. If the debt is assigned to a collection agency and the collector obtains the money, a percentage of it is kept by the agency, while the remainder goes to the creditor. If the collector buys debts for 10 cents on the dollar, they own it, and they will want 100% from you.

Why was my account turned over to a collection agency?

The bank could not locate you or contact you.

Your debt is over 120 days late.

You moved out of state and they still can’t reach you.

These are the primary reasons why a lender or a credit card company would assign or sell your debt to a collection agency.

 

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Have you checked your mailbox? (Day 30 & 60)

Hello!

Have you received any updates from the credit bureaus, creditors or collectors? If the answer is yes, then please send those updates over to our team right away. Sending your updates to us when you receive them will help our team analyze your results and prepare for the next dispute round. But if we don’t receive them in a timely manner, it could delay the dispute process of trying to remove inaccurate information from your credit report.

 

 

How to send:

You can text, mail, or email us your updated information.

 

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What happens when the bureau refused to fix the account (Day 25)

Hello!

For years, credit bureaus have taken advantage of consumers who lack knowledge in the credit repair process by failing to investigate legitimate disputes. Because the credit bureau’s business is driven by profits, they tend to take the word of the creditor when it comes to verifying a negative account. It does not matter if the account is incorrect; the credit bureaus will still state that the damaging item is verified as yours. This in return will continue to damage your credit worthiness. To keep the credit bureaus objective, there are various organizations that you, as a consumer, can contact. We are here to assist you if any of these organizations need to be contacted.

 

There was no change in my report, now what?

 

After the 30-day investigation period is over, the credit bureau will send you an updated credit report indicating the changes, if any. They will say one of the following:

The item has been verified and no change has been made.

They consider the dispute frivolous.

They feel that you are working with a credit repair company.

Your account has been updated with new information.

They need more information to continue your disputes.

Your dispute letter is suspicious.

Or

The account has been removed or deleted

 

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Did you receive your Welcome Packet from us? (Day 28)

 

Hello!

Have you received our WELCOME PACKET in the mail? This would include pre-paid envelopes ready for you to mail any letters you may have received from the credit bureaus, creditors or collectors? If the answer is yes, then please follow the instructions

 

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The Dispute Process (Day 12)

Hello!

Thank you for being a part of the family. You may already know how the dispute process works, but I would like to go over it again with you. We have found that by disputing certain accounts before others, the result can be more deletions in a shorter amount of time. We have found that if we dispute too many at once; the bureaus will dismiss the dispute as "frivolous." After the bureaus investigate, they will send you an updated credit report within 30-45 days. We ask that you forward all credit reports and any letters that you receive from the credit bureaus, collectors, or creditors. When we receive the information, we will update your file and dispute again.

 

Client Portal Reminder

The client tracking portal is your main way of tracking your credit restoration progress after your first dispute rounds go out. With this portal, you can see what accounts we are disputing on your behalf. You can also see your credit scores, send us messages, documents, and referrals. The client portal login credentials are sensitive, so make sure you type in the information as presented in the email.

As soon as you receive updates, please do the following steps:

1.Scan in your reports and send them through the client portal.
2.Log into your online client portal. (login information is case sensitive)
3.Find the tab that states ‘Documents’.
4.Upload the updates and send.
5. You can also fax or Email them to us.(check for our fax number at the end of this email)

It’s important that you send your updates right away so that we can continue working on your credit reports. If you delay in sending your reports, it will delay the credit repair process. If you have any questions or concerns regarding this e-mail or your case, please feel free to contact us. We are more than happy to be of assistance!

 

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When does negative information come off my credit report (Day 17)

 

Hello!

Each negative item has a federal statute of limitation on when it must drop off your credit report. Once the statute of limitation has expired, the item must be deleted from your credit report according to the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The statute of limitation starts 180 days from the date the account became delinquent.

Federal Statute of Limitations

The statute starts 180 days from the date the account became delinquent. For example, if your payment was due on January 1st, but you did not pay it until February 1st, you would be considered 30 days late. Now, count 180 days from February, which will take you to July. This month will be the time the seven-year statute will begin.

Late payments:

Once you become more than 30 days late on any of your bills, the financial institution that you hold a loan with will disclose your late status to the credit bureau. You can be reported as 30, 60, 90, or 120 days late, and by law, the late marks will remain on your credit report for seven years.

Inquiries:

Whenever you apply for a credit card or a loan, your credit report is checked, which results in a hard inquiry. These inquiries could damage your credit score if you have more than six in two months. They can also stay on your credit report for up to two years.

Charge-offs:

These are debts that the creditor felt that they could not collect on anymore after 180 days. So they charged them off as a bad debt. However, the creditor can still sell the account to a third-party collector for collection purposes.

Judgments:

If a creditor takes you to court and sues for a judgment, this destructive item will be placed on your credit report. The courts issue judgments that can stay on your credit report for up to seven-years, but it can be renewed until it is paid or until it reaches the 20-year mark.

Child support:

If you stop making child support payments, it becomes part of your public record and will therefore show up on your credit report. This negative mark can stay on your report for up to seven years.

Foreclosure/Repossession:

Foreclosures take place when you default on your home mortgage and the bank takes the house back. Re-possession is when you can no longer pay your car note and it goes into default. The lender will then confiscate the vehicle without your permission and sell it in an auction. Both create negative marks that will remain on your credit report for seven years.

Tax liens:

Tax liens are public records that will find their way into your credit report if you default on your tax liability with the IRS. Paid tax liens will stay on your credit report for seven years, but while owed, they can remain

on your record forever.

Collection:

If you see an old account on your credit report under the collection trade-line, this is a bill that was sold or assigned to a collection agency. It was passed onto the collector from your original creditor because you refused to pay. This debt can legally stay on your credit report for up to 7.5 years, but you cannot be sued for it after the state statute of limitation has expired. See appendix for the state statute of limitation on revolving accounts.

Bankruptcies:

Your credit report will list the date you filed for bankruptcy and the time it was discharged. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy can remain on your credit report anywhere from seven to 10 years depending on your state, and a Chapter 13 bankruptcy will remain on your credit report for seven years. A dismissed bankruptcy will stay on your credit report for 10 years even though it was not discharged. A dismissed bankruptcy means you started the proceedings but you changed your mind and decided not to complete the process.

 

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Welcome call from Customer Care (Day 5)

HELLO!

 

We appreciate you choosing TFA to assist you in restoring your credit and improving your FICO scores! We aim to personally call and text all of our new clients within a 48-72 hour period. If we spoke to you already you should have our Customer Cares number and e-mail address but just in case you missed our call or that info it’s: 442-229-5480 and customercare@topflightassistance.com

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Credit Bureau Stall Letters (Day 15)

Hello,

 While restoring your credit, you will receive many updates from the credit bureaus. Some of these updates will be in the form of stall letters. Bureaus send these out hoping that you will stop your dispute efforts. Here are some examples of these letters:

Experian: Suspicious letter:

You may receive a letter from the credit bureau stating that your disputes are suspicious and they will not further investigate.  If you receive this, the credit bureaus are trying to stall you hoping that you stop the credit repair process.  Just forward this letter to us.

Equifax: Check your status online:

You may receive an email from Equifax stating that the investigation has started and you can check your updates online by clicking the link below. It's best that we stick with the mail. If you start reviewing your results online, Equifax will expect the next disputes to go through their site, and that is not what we want to do.

Asking for Proof of identification

You may receive a letter from the credit bureau stating that they need more information to prove your identity. We will provide them with the information they need. They are asking for proof of Identification. If you receive this, the credit bureaus are trying to stall you hoping that you stop the credit repair process.  Just forward this letter to us.

Coming from a Credit repair company

You may receive a letter from the credit bureaus stating that they think that the dispute letters are coming from a credit repair company and not you. If you receive this, the credit bureaus are trying to stall you hoping that you stop the credit repair process.  Just forward this letter to us.

All three Bureaus: Frivolous

You may receive a letter from the credit bureau stating that your disputes frivolous, and they will not further investigate this matter. We know how to respond to this type of update.

If you receive this, the credit bureaus are trying to stall you hoping that you stop the credit repair process.  Just forward this letter to us.

FICO score (Day 6)

Hello!

Understanding the FICO Score

Not understanding the five elements that make up your FICO score could have a tremendous negative effect on getting approved for credit. For example, if you are 30 days late within the first two years of having an account, this could bring your credit score down by 30 points. In return, you could get denied for a home loan based on that single 30-days-late indication. In today’s society, your credit score is used whenever you apply for credit, so it’s important that you understand how to raise it and maintain it. Monitoring the five areas of your credit score will let you know which areas need improvement. Once you achieve the score you are aiming for, you must maintain it through education and discipline.

 

What is a FICO score?

A FICO score is a three-digit number that is built from the information contained in your credit report. It summarizes information like your negative accounts, payment history, the amount of debt you carry, the length of your credit history, the amount of new credit you applied for, and the type of trade lines you have in your report.

 

How do I start a score?

To get a score, you need one trade line on your file for six months, and that account must have been updated in the past six months. You can accomplish this by simply opening up a secured credit card account with one of the banks listed in Chapter 8.

What is a good score?

Lenders say that with a 720-760 score, you get the best prime rates. With a 620, you get the sub-prime, riskier rates.

750-850 - Excellent.

660-749 – Good.

620-659 – Fair.

350-619 – Poor.

Where can I get my score?

You can get your score from various online companies, but it won’t be your true FICO score because the organizations are not pulling their scores from the FICO model. These scores will only give you a close in-dictation of what your numbers are. Only order your credit score from MyFICO.com because that’s what most lenders use when making a decision to grant you credit. When looking at your score, pay attention to the middle number because these are the numbers lenders focus on. For example, say your score from Experian is 650, Equifax is 700, and TransUnion is 742. The lender will look at the 700 score to make their lending decision. This is called the middle score. You can also pull your score from all three credit bureaus, though they use their own model to calculate your credit score.

 

How is my score calculated?

It’s calculated by your payment history, the amount you owe, the length of your credit, what new credit you have applied for, and the type of trade lines you have.

 

Payment history

Your paying habits are 35 % of your credit score. If your late payments are recent, it will lower your score more than if you were behind in the past. In addition, a 90-day-late indication will severely damage your score over a 30-day mark. In addition, public records like tax liens, judgments, and bankruptcies fall into the same category and could take your score down even further, so make sure you are current with the creditors and always pay your bills on time.

Amount you owe

The balance on your accounts is 30% of your available credit score. So, using all of your credit will worry lenders and hurt your score. The lower your balance is, the better your score. You want to keep your balances around 7% to 10% for each account. Also, if you make a big purchase and want to maintain the 10% balance level, make sure you pay off your purchased item before your bill cycles. If you pay after the cycle, the lender will report your high balance.

Length of credit

The amount of time you’ve had your credit makes up 15% of your credit score. The age on your trade lines is very important to lenders because it shows that you have paid your bills on time. Reliability and longevity are good traits for additional credit, so don’t close old accounts. If you have too many accounts and you want to close a few, close the accounts that are new with low limits.

New credit

New credit makes up 10% of your score. The FICO model looks at how many accounts you’ve applied for lately as well as any fresh accounts you have opened. The model looks at time passed since you requested new credit, and the amount of time since you opened another account. If you open too many accounts in a short period of time, you will look desperate to the lenders, and they don’t like loaning money to needy customers. So, try not to apply for more than two new accounts per year.

Type of credit you use

This section makes up 10% of your score. FICO wants to see a healthy mix of trade lines like a couple of major bank cards, retail store cards, and installment loans like a car, personal, or

 

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What is a Credit Report and why is it important? (Day 3)

Hello!

 

 

Your credit report is a snapshot of your payment history for all credit transactions that you have from age 18 until now. It details when you applied for credit, how many positive and negative accounts you have, who viewed your credit report, and all your personal information. Reviewing your credit report every four to six months gives you a chance to check for identity theft, inaccurate accounts, and incorrect information. It allows you to manage your financial situation before applying for a credit card, auto loan, bank loan, mortgage loan, employment, or insurance. For example, if you check your credit and notice that there are a few negative items on your report, you will have a chance to fix those items before applying for credit. By doing this, you avoid embarrassment and several inquiries, which lowers your credit score.

 

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What law regulates collection agencies? (Day 8)

Hello!

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act regulates the collection agencies and prohibits them from doing the following:

They can only contact a third party to secure your location when they are trying to locate you, but they cannot disclose the matter of the call.
 

After the collection agency knows that you have legal representation, they must communicate only with your attorney, unless the attorney fails to respond within a reasonable time.
 

They cannot call you before 8 a.m. or after 9 p.m.
 

They cannot call your job if your employment prohibits personal phone calls,
 

The collector cannot discuss your debt with any third party unless it’s your attorney, a credit bureau, the creditor, or the creditor’s attorney.
 

If you notify the collector in writing that you want them to stop calling and sending you letters, they must stop. They can still send you one last letter advising you what actions they will take next.
 

They cannot harass, oppress, abuse, threaten use of violence, use obscene or profane language, cause your telephone to ring repeatedly with the intent to be annoying, or make calls to your house without disclosing their identity.
 

They may not use any false, deceptive, or misleading representation while trying to collect any debt.
 

They can’t appear to be affiliated with any government or law enforcement agency, representation that they are attorneys, threaten to garnish your wages, or say that they can have you arrested and imprisoned. Furthermore, they cannot threaten to take action that cannot legally be taken.
 

In addition, they cannot use unfair or unconscionable means to collect, or attempt to collect, any debt.
 

They cannot collect interest, fees, or charges (unless authorized by a signed original agreement between you and the creditor), or threaten to deposit a postdated check issued by you.

 

If you dispute the debt within 30 days of receiving a notice from the collector, they must obtain verification of the debt or a copy of the judgment and mail it out to you, upon re-quest, within 30 days.

 

They must cease collection of the debt until they obtain verification of the debt.

 

If you have multiple debts with one collection agency, they must apply the payment to the debt you advise them to pay.

 

 

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Case updates Day (20)

Hello!

Have you received any updates from the credit bureaus, creditors or collectors? If the answer is yes, then please send those updates over to our team right away. Sending your updates to us when you receive them will help our team analyze your results and prepare for the next dispute round. But if we don’t receive them in a timely manner, it could delay the dispute process of trying to remove inaccurate information from your credit report.

Are you current with your payments? Don’t cause delays in your credit repair process!

Contact TFA Customer Care TODAY to ensure your payments are up-to-date and we have all necessary documents. You can text, mail, or email us your updated information.

 

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Welcome To Top Flight Assistance (Day 1)

HELLO!

 

We appreciate you choosing TFA to assist you in restoring your credit and improving your FICO scores! Our communication, integrity, and results will be of the highest level. Here at TFA our client experience and satisfaction is top priority, and this requires us to work together.  Just know, we are on your side. Throughout the process we will need your cooperation, compliance and patience as this is a full legal process that requires detailed work time on our end.

 

We will be in continued correspondence as we get you into processing and throughout the entire process!

 

Please Be Advised if for any Reason you are Not Satisfied, Need a payment extension or to Cancel your credit repair, as per your Legal Binding Contract you are Required to Contact our Admin Department Directly Prior to any action towards Canceling payments with your bank to prevent any Legal Court Action towards you or your credit.

 

Again, welcome to the TFA family- If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to call us. Please watch this short video to understand the credit repair process more thoroughly!

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWDVIeRQATk